Adobe Shockwave EOL


#1

Officially announced here, on February 25, 2019
End of Life for Adobe Shockwave

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for End of Life of Adobe Shockwave

Effective April 9, 2019, Adobe Shockwave will be discontinued and the Shockwave player for Windows will no longer be available for download.

Companies with existing Enterprise licenses for Adobe Shockwave continue to receive support until the end of their current contracts.

Adobe Shockwave is a browser-based multimedia platform for interactive applications and video games. Retiring the Shockwave player for Windows is the last step in a multi-year process: Adobe Director, an authoring tool for Shockwave content, was discontinued on February 1, 2017 and the Shockwave player for macOS was discontinued on March 1, 2017.

Adobe continues to offer a rich set of content creation tools through Creative Cloud, including Adobe Animate for authoring interactive content for multiple platforms, such HTML5 Canvas, WebGL, Flash/Adobe AIR, and others.

For more information, please see the FAQ below.


Why is Adobe discontinuing the Shockwave player?

As technologies evolve and the use of mobile devices has grown, interactive content has moved to platforms such as HTML5 Canvas and Web GL and usage of Shockwave has declined.

When will the End of Life take effect?

Starting on April 9, 2019, Shockwave player for Windows will no longer be available for download. Adobe will no longer accept ETLA and EULA agreements for Shockwave effective on April 9, 2019.

Will I still have technical support for Shockwave?

Support for individual customers will end on April 9, 2019. Customers with EULA distribution licensing will continue to receive support until the end of their 1-year contract. Enterprise customers will continue to be supported until the end of their contracts in 2022.

Why is Adobe providing advance notice?

Adobe is providing advance notice to help customers prepare for the change. Retiring the Shockwave player for Windows is the last step in a multi-year process: Adobe Director, an authoring tool for Shockwave content, was discontinued on February 1, 2017 and the Shockwave player for macOS was discontinued on March 1, 2017.

Are there other Adobe products that can replace this functionality?

In its time, Adobe Director and Shockwave provided a powerful solution for creating and playing web-based animation and game content. Through Creative Cloud, Adobe offers a rich toolset for modern web content, prototyping, and design, including:

  • Adobe Animate for authoring multimedia content for HTML5 Canvas, WebGL, Flash/Adobe AIR, and other web-based platforms
  • Adobe XD for designing and prototyping mobile and web-based user experiences
  • Adobe Dreamweaver designing, coding, and publishing responsive website for browsers and mobile devices

Other Creative Cloud applications widely used in animation and design workflows include Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator.

and commented here

Adobe Is Finally Killing Shockwave Player for Good

with the classic disdain from so called journalists

here few excerpt

In its mid-aughts heyday, Shockwave was used by designers to create fancy splash pages for websites, interactive CD-ROMs, and web games. Like its sister software Flash, it was developed by Macromedia before that company was acquired by Adobe in 2005. Both applications came to define an era of over-complicated animated interfaces and simple time-wasting video games.

if you did program in Lingo, big news, you were not a real developer
if you ever wandered into programming Director extensions (native code), the equivalent of ANE, same you were not a real developer

and wether you did Director or Flash, they were both doing over-complicated and time-wasting stuff…

and

… but that special period when every button had an animated rollover and three distinct sounds for mouse interaction will be widely forgotten by the new generation.

instead this new generation will install “free” weather app and be geo-tracked, play “free” mobile games and have the luxury of in-app purchase in the range of $99 per item, and other stuff that does not make any sound, certainly not 3 distinct sounds, when they shit on the users privacy

great era for the new generation!!!


Me on the other end, I will make another kind of comment, I dabbled a little bit with Director, and I jumped right away into Flash, but when you compare the two, it is clear that Director was the necessary stepping stone for Flash to become a great product.

Not that Director was bad, but all the good parts have inspired Flash (the timeline, the binary format SWF, etc.), and while improving Flash, the developers clearly did not make the same “mistakes” they did with Director (not really mistakes, but more like same features with less shortcoming).

Simply put, without Director existing first, Flash would have been much different and probably less of a great tool.

Another thing to take from that, for all the people that spread FUD about the future death of Adobe AIR, yet again Adobe is providing advance notice, they just don’t kill a product “like that” without warning.