Chrome dev summit 2017 keynote


Keynote (Chrome Dev Summit 2017)

Within those keynotes, there are 2 references to Flash and ActionScript

first, at 10:02

the recent deprecation of Flash really shows just how capable though
the modern web media platform is, here’s an example of Jio Cinema
where they bring this all together and show a really really nice
web media experience that shines

just sayin’ … to which golden standard they gonna compare this web media experience?
yep that’s Flash :smile:

and second, at 18:30

This takes us to JavaScript, the last member of our trinity so to speak,
and it had a fascinating history, going from its origins in the 10-day
“epic hack” at Netscape to unfortunate episodes like entire versions
that were spec’ed out but not fully shipped

Yeah they are talking about ES4 upon which AS3 is based and so …

Yeah anyone remember ES4? yeah …
ActionScript you know, it was a thing …
That time does feel like a bit of distant memory as modern JavaScript
has come a long way with browser support iterating and improving rapidly

So, from Flash is deprecated to ActionScript is dead (“it was a thing”)
all that is just a “distant memory” …
man, those Goole guys have some mouth on them

In fact, in the last year, the majority of browsers have shipped compeling
support for a whole new batch of features in JavaScript, known collectively as
‘ECMAScript 2015’ and crumbs coverage is now basically at 100%, …

Just as a reminder if you are confused (from the wikipedia page)

  • ECMAScript 3
    December 1999
  • ECMAScript 4
    abandoned because it was “breaking the web”
  • ECMAScript 3.1 or ECMAScript 5 (ES5)
    December 2009
  • ECMAScript 2015 is ES6 (also ECMAScript Harmony)
    June 2015
  • ECMAScript 2016 is ES7
    June 2016
  • ECMAScript 2017 is ES8
    June 2017

Just to be clear that now in October 2017 they are all happy that the ES6 spec from June 2015
is finally available in most of browsers, yeah… took more than 2 years.

So I could comment a lot on this keynote, but nah I’m OK…
I would only reiterate what I have been posting lately about the importance of the web
to a small indie dev shop (1-8 dev max).

If they have fun looking at AS3 feeling like a “distant memory” and how ES4 was “breaking the web”
it’s because Google and by extension the Chrome team is only focused on web apps
(which is their own little interest as more people use browsers more people use their search engines, ads platform, etc.).

But as a small indie dev, even if I like the web and apps on the web to a certain extend,
I do remember that the original concept for something like Adobe AIR is to provide
and Out Of Browser experience, and I use it to “break out of the web” and especially its limitations.

And each time I see those full of themselves JS dev who think they can replace any apps
I get more and more motivated to build apps that are completely out of their reach :wink:.

For me it is about building apps (and so with a great experience), it’s not about the web
which feels like the lowest common denominator of the user experience.

1 Like

a little follow up with this
I Watched All of the Chrome Dev Summit 2017 Videos So You Don’t Have To

I guess you can see this as a fairly unbiased comment :smile:


Now for the biased comments (mine), some times ago I invested some time (not too much)
to study and work with the JS frameworks “a la mode”
see some previous posts

The idea was “maybe find a job as JS dev” but “is it worth it?”,
at the time my personal conclusion was in short

  • I felt JS and by extension JS frameworks are not there yet
  • the page Google Developers Web Tools which at the time (and still is)
    was advising Angular2 and/or Polymer really made me think “it’s definitively not ready”
  • so I gonna stick with building any kind of apps (mobile, desktop, server) but web apps

I stopped short fucking my brain with any new JS frameworks and literally gave up on JS
for the following simple reason “I don’t want to waste my time”.

About 1,5 years later, I’m so happy I invested my time in other things (like Redtamarin, Adobe AIR, etc.),
because look at those JS posts, it is still a huge mess.

here how I touch JS frameworks :smile:

from the hacker news comments on
“I Watched All of the Chrome Dev Summit 2017 Videos So You Don’t Have To”

here a little interaction

user A
I attended the event in person, and overall enjoyed it. But I keep wondering: is the reason Google wants us to squeeze our file sizes and page load time down to the bare minimum because they want to maximize the bandwidth available for more and larger ads?

user B
No, it’s a much larger existential threat. It because they’re fighting to keep the web competitive with native apps. The more that the world shifts from the web to native apps, the less people use their web search engine.

user C
I agree. Elsewhere in this thread, @kinlan on the Google Developer Relations team says that their goal is “to make the web experiences better, instant and accessible and available to everyone,” and that’s true, but Google makes money by making the web better. The more people use the web, the more people use Google search, and the more valuable Google’s ads are.
If the web is slow or unusable (especially on mobile in India, for example), then Google search is useless on mobile in India, so nobody will want to buy mobile search ads in India.

This is exactly why Google works on Chrome, Angular, Web Components, etc.

this

Google makes money by making the web better.
The more people use the web,
the more people use Google search,
and the more valuable Google’s ads are

is almost a word for word what you would hear within Google
if a new employee would ask “why this?”

which totally explains this strategy
(also very well summarised and slightly edited)

[Native apps are] a much larger existential threat.
[That’s why Google is] fighting to keep the web competitive with native apps.
The more that the world shifts from the web to native apps,
the less people use [Google’s] web search engine.

which also explains the hate on Flash and/or why Google Chrome dev team
is so adamant to block this pesky plugin that users still want to use

See, native apps are as “dangerous” as flash apps in the browser
they both share those common traits: does not work well with web search
and does not integrate well with ads.

Little fun fact:
guess who was the most pissed off when gaforflash was released?
people from Google Ads :smile:

Why do you think there is an AdMob SDK for Android and iOS
but nothing for desktop apps ?

In fact, if you use a web view in your desktop app to display google ads,
it is not allowed, it is against the TOS, you may end up having your account closed/banned.

Answer is simple:

  • for desktop, if you want to make money with ads you got to have a web site/app
  • for mobile, because the app store only accept native apps (not web apps)
    they have no other way to tolerate native apps working with their “web” ads

Result?

You can not produce free desktop apps supported by advertising because
it does not align with Google search and ads strategy.
Only somewhat equivalent is to use in-app purchase and publish your app
through an app store, either Windows 10 UWP or macOS App Store.

1 Like